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Change by Design – Invisible Helmet November 13, 2013

Posted by @Karen_Fu in creativity, design, industrial design, Innovation, talent.
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Invisible Helmet

Quick paste of this video above  to share via Facebook from ‘Irene Emerita’. We can never underestimate the technical and design innovation done by women, which is usually expected in men. Watch it to see its ingenuity. – Karen Fu

 

May 7, 2012

Posted by @Karen_Fu in change, education, human quality, life challenges, real power, Singapore, talent.
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Excellent reflection. I think you are a scholar in your own right. And if more people come to think along these terms and beyond, they will not harbour resentment from the ground about students or graduates from elite schools. I too question the nature of how schools are run. The emphasis of A-s and academic reputation via conventional old culture is really redundant and even harmful to real education that focuses on knowledge to serve the people to the best of our ability, in full earnest dedication. Not a mere dive into academic prestige. Knowledge must be used to enhance lives. By that, it must encompass due diligence to learn from the ground too– not just to aim for top schools and gain your personal reputation. Cheers!

guanyinmiao's musings

Note: Two weeks ago, a number of former Chinese High students spontaneously penned two separate FaceBook notes about their experiences when they were in school.

It’s been about two weeks since Wei Leong’s FaceBook note (here) and Jianrui’s follow-up (here) were published, and I’m pretty sure that most of us within their social circles and even beyond have been charmed by their sentiment and post-graduation enlightenment.

I’ve read them too (a lot of times, in fact, in order to pen this article), and in my first time reading it I was reminiscing and feeling nostalgic about my own school days as well. I agree with most, nearly all of the points raised. School is indeed the best place to venture into new realms, make mistakes. School was where I forged most of my closest friendships, created the best memories and most importantly learnt about the world…

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A Lego Lesson. April 16, 2012

Posted by @Karen_Fu in change, creativity, Economy, talent.
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Issues on global talent came as I was watching the video. There are clearly many British and American educated individuals in the video. If I were to shut my eyes up just listening to them, I would have thought they were natives. It can be a strange sight to see. But with the propagation of western colleges doing transnational education as well as an increased demand for overseas western education, many students are opting to learn abroad if they have the opportunity.

Many creative individuals appeared to bear a strong multicultural background. Just like the interviewee who is a Malaysian graduated from Harvard, a good number of well known people tend to also have a ‘Rojak’ (Malay word for a delicious mixed salad of fruit and vegetables) blood of Asian and caucasian mix. Either this, or they often come from a rich diversified experience of multiethnic cultures.

As I watched on, I cannot help but to compare with what Iskandar, where Legoland is, has to offer, I cannot help asking why Singapore could not have legoland and universal studios without the casinos. Iskandar is only a strait away from Singapore and they are blooming the area up with Eco diversity living waterfront houses apart with hi tech industries. My gut feeling is that many will be lured to the region. If they could create the kind of security like we have over here, they could easily attract many to their shores for investments.

Our recent debate on raising the minimum wage and wage freeze for top income earners focus on keeping the local economy sustainable. As far as I see it, focusing on costs alone will not see us through. Surely we need to raise salary only when productivity is good. But to deprive the lower income group earners by cutting manufacturing / service costs is just as bad, if not worse. Could we be more innovative in our course in economics without slashing pay of employees when the cost of living is getting to be uncontainable? Lego started off from a small cottage industry to a mega toy business that isn’t confined to just play value. It has also been used in even furniture and architectural structures out from their simple block unit. Why is it that we cannot replicate such creativity instead of drooling on cutting costs ? If the lower income blue collar get their wages so low that they can’t economically survive, be sure to expect high social costs in due course. To start off burning costs as a mantra, be also sure that middle income earners pay will be controlled and marked downwards too. In fact, this is happening as the global economy isn’t good and companies both big and small are trying to slash wages paid to employees.

Often I feel we need a good flip. When things don’t get better, then it is high time we skip it and try something new. What maybe a soft skill may turn out big. We dont need to follow what most people do. The time when you start seeing many entering the same field, that’s the time you should be thinking of another emerging field.

There are many ways of leveraging what we don’t have. Our forefathers have done it. Why is it our generation seems to be talking backwards? We have the brains and the talent here but I think many are underutilized. If you were creative, what would you do? If I have the chance, I would flip it. — Karen Fu

Addition 17-4-2012 from my own quoted comment on Facebook : Cost cutting is not the way to go. Quality and innovation is. When you start to focus on the money alone, the result is you missed the innovation. Finally both firm and employees loose really — Karen Fu