jump to navigation

In God We Trust, In truth We trust. July 3, 2013

Posted by @Karen_Fu in faith, human quality, real power, social media.
Tags: , , , , , ,
add a comment

Mid night thoughts here to share. And I will just write what I think here. This isn’t the first time I get people, who prey on my bluntness online. I think I need to fine tune to people who play on my weaknesses. But this incident made me think a lot about people and minds, and the kind of world we are going to get if we retain the kind of cunning behaviors. Online behaviors are easier to catch because it can be traced. But offline ones can be a little difficult. But in due course, one can still see the genuine characters of people. There are responsibilities in the lines of speech, and the intentions behind the actions and purpose. Actually stalking and posting irrelevant replies online could also be seen as offensive. I suppose my post here can also be seen as a rant but I think there are precious lessons to be learnt.

Reread his dialogue on the thread on Facebook, I think I have let him played on me by using open lines that could be played around later. Can’t do anything now that he has disappeared right after I posted the reply in this *thread. While looking at the link just a moment ago, his name has fully disappeared and a ‘Facebook user’ is after an empty image. Honestly, I was furious. It felt like playing around, shooting it out and before you read on, all have vanished. Reminds me of another incident last year where this came from an old school mate whom I have not seen for more than 15 years or so. A completely changed person, who actually was a model student in school, now divorced from her husband who is now allowed to legally keep the children from her. She played on insulting by going to a place that we had agreed not to go as I couldn’t take the sort of seafood they were offering. Obviously she didn’t care and went on to arrange the whole dinner 30 minutes before the stated time and had her dinner with another friend of ours. So when I arrived, they had already eaten and were too full to eat. She apologized unwillingly that I wanted to skip the dinner meet up. But I want to see the other friend, so I went. Then I wished I didn’t. It was insulting to hear them looking down on my profession as well as showing disbelief that I could do up the kind of work they think I couldnt because I was not academically as brilliant as they were. That incident was something similar in the sense she felt that God knew what she was doing and she was righteous about it. To be honest, I hate that line after what she did. I have nothing against Christians but I do hate Christians who played around the notion of God. God is the almighty in Christianity. Actions and intentions are seen very clearly under Heaven’s eyes. I don’t know why such people want to do it, they may be thinking they could get away with it. I have stopped talking to her and I make it open I do not condone the act. She had had a line of misfortunes that saw her in huge distress and she still failed to understand why all her children are in irreversible trouble and blamed that God hadn’t treated them fairly. I think I may know the answer that her sins were not repented. As a Christian, or indeed with all other non Christians, aren’t we suppose to repent and learn from life horrors? The strangest thing was after that, all her lines of story were revealed to me by accident. I genuinely believe that good health and well being comes from a genuinely kind soul. Especially so when you have a religion. Not a nice comment here, but these online dialogues remind me of that incident. He is going to use this as his next social media presentation. This itself is a retaliation behind. My facebook cannot tarnish his image. It is his own presentation that could do more harm.

I can’t stop anyone from saying and doing anything they want, as I am no God. I probably sound more religious than at least these two persons I have mentioned as I am a free thinker; but I do believe we are looked upon by just one common Lord. And the Lord is no dumbbell to not able to see the real intentions and actions. I wouldn’t dare to play around under the eyes of heaven. It does come around. – Karen Fu

Personal Reference:
1. Facebook private messages and dialogue replies on the 2-7-13 and the 3-7-13 (see ref on separate threads)

‘The Power Of Living In Truth’ Jeffery D Sachs December 22, 2011

Posted by @Karen_Fu in ethics, human quality, real power.
Tags: , , , , ,
add a comment

I really like the whole message that Prof Sachs has written and posted online.  Though there is Law in place, the justice is never really quite done. But I suppose where there is darkness, there is also light. Where it will cast a shadow to those who are hideous. I don’t think I need to add anything more but I will quote from this site :

 

NEW YORK – The world’s greatest shortage is not of oil, clean water, or food, but of moral leadership. With a commitment to truth – scientific, ethical, and personal – a society can overcome the many crises of poverty, disease, hunger, and instability that confront us. Yet power abhors truth, and battles it relentlessly. So let us pause to express gratitude to Václav Havel, who died this month, for enabling a generation to gain the chance to live in truth.

Havel was a pivotal leader of the revolutionary movements that culminated in freedom in Eastern Europe and the end, 20 years ago this month, of the Soviet Union. Havel’s plays, essays, and letters described the moral struggle of living honestly under Eastern Europe’s Communist dictatorships. He risked everything to live in truth, as he called it – honest to himself and heroically honest to the authoritarian power that repressed his society and crushed the freedoms of hundreds of millions.

He paid dearly for this choice, spending several years in prison and many more under surveillance, harassment, and censorship of his writings. Yet the glow of truth spread. Havel gave hope, courage, and even fearlessness to a generation of his compatriots. When the web of lies collapsed in November 1989, hundreds of thousands of Czechs and Slovaks poured into the streets to proclaim their freedom  – and to sweep the banished and jailed playwright into Prague Castle as Czechoslovakia’s newly elected president.

I personally witnessed the power of living in truth in that year, when the leadership of Poland’s Solidarity movement asked me to help Poland with its transition to democracy and a market economy – part of what the Poles called their “return to Europe.” I met and was profoundly inspired by many in the region who, like Havel, lived in truth: Adam Michnik, Jacek Kuron, Bronislaw Geremek, Gregorsz Lindenberg, Jan Smolar, Irena Grosfeld, and, of course, Lech Walesa. These brave men and women, and those like Tadeusz Mazowiecki and Leszek Balcerowicz, who led Poland during its first steps in freedom, succeeded through their combination of courage, intellect, and integrity.

The power of truth-telling that year created a dazzling sense of possibility, for it proved the undoing of one of history’s most recalcitrant hegemonies: Soviet domination of Eastern Europe. Michnik, like Havel, radiated the joy of fearless truth. I asked him in July 1989, as Poland’s communist regime was already unraveling, when freedom would reach Prague. He replied, “By the end of the year.”

“How do you know?” I asked. “I was just with Havel in the mountains last week,” he said. “Have no fear. Freedom is on the way.”  His forecast was correct, of course, with a month to spare.

Just as lies and corruption are contagious, so, too, moral truth and bravery spreads from one champion to another. Havel and Michnik could succeed in part because of the miracle of Mikhail Gorbachev, the Soviet leader who emerged from a poisoned system, yet who valued truth above force. And Gorbachev could triumph in part because of the sheer power of honesty of his countryman, Andrei Sakharov, the great and fearless nuclear physicist who also risked all to speak truth in the very heart of the Soviet empire – and who paid for it with years of internal exile.

These pillars of moral leadership typically drew upon still other examples, including that of Mahatma Gandhi, who called his autobiography The Story of My Experiments With Truth. They all believed that truth, both scientific and moral, could ultimately prevail against any phalanx of lies and power. Many died in the service of that belief; all of us alive today reap the benefits of their faith in the power of truth in action.

Havel’s life is a reminder of the miracles that such a credo can bring about; yet it is also a reminder of the more somber fact that truth’s victories are never definitive. Each generation must adapt its moral foundations to the ever-changing conditions of politics, culture, society, and technology.

Havel’s death comes at a time of massive demonstrations in Russia to protest ballot fraud; violence in Egypt as democratic activists battle the deeply entrenched military; an uprising in rural China against corrupt local officials; and police in body armor violently dismantling the Occupy protest sites in American cities. Power and truth remain locked in combat around the world.

Much of today’s struggle – everywhere – pits truth against greed. Even if our challenges are different from those faced by Havel, the importance of living in truth has not changed.

Today’s reality is of a world in which wealth translates into power, and power is abused in order to augment personal wealth, at the expense of the poor and the natural environment. As those in power destroy the environment, launch wars on false pretexts, foment social unrest, and ignore the plight of the poor, they seem unaware that they and their children will also pay a heavy price.

Moral leaders nowadays should build on the foundations laid by Havel. Many people, of course, now despair about the possibilities for constructive change. Yet the battles that we face – against powerful corporate lobbies, relentless public-relations spin, and our governments’ incessant lies – are a shadow of what Havel, Michnik, Sakharov, and others faced when taking on brutal Soviet-backed regimes.

In contrast to these titans of dissent, we are empowered with the instruments of social media to spread the word, overcome isolation, and mobilize millions in support of reform and renewal. Many of us enjoy minimum protections of speech and assembly, though these are inevitably hard won, imperfect, and fragile. Yet, of the profoundest importance and benefit, we are also blessed with the enduring inspiration of Havel’s life in truth.

Jeffrey D. Sachs is Professor of Economics and Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University. He is also Special Adviser to United Nations Secretary-General on the Millennium Development Goals.

Copyright: Project Syndicate, 2011.
http://www.project-syndicate.org